Confined is a new exhibition by formerly incarcerated Indigenous people
20.04.2022

Confined is a new exhibition by formerly incarcerated Indigenous people

The Torch
Image: Flick Chafer-Smith, Ngarrindjeri, 'Tiddalick'
words by sidonie bird de la coeur

Confined is an exhibition containing 400 extraordinary artworks by 350 Indigenous artists who are currently incarcerated or have just been released from Victorian prisons.

Presented as part of The Torch’s Indigenous Arts in Prisons and Community Program, Confined is an annual series of artworks that showcases the art of both currently and recently incarcerated Indigenous people.

What you need to know

  • Confined is an exhibition that features art from Indigenous artists who are currently in or recently released from prisons in Victoria
  • It is presented as part of The Torch’s Indigenous Arts in Prisons and Community Program
  • The exhibition will run from May 5 – June 5, at the Glen Eira City Council Gallery in Caulfield.

Keep up to date with Melbourne’s latest art events, exhibitions and performances here.

This years’ exhibition coincides with National Reconciliation Week and features a broad range of media, including paintings, sculpture, textiles, ceramics and more. The exhibition can also be viewed virtually, via The Torch website, to accommodate for the ever increasing national and international audience of the Confined exhibitions.

“Every footstep I take now is connected to the earth. I’d never had much self-confidence but Culture has given me a greater understanding of life,” states Ash Thomas of the Yorta Yorta/Wiradjuri peoples. “Without it I would have gotten out of jail without direction and guidance. I believe in myself now and found who I really am.  I’m proud of the man I am today.”

 

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CEO of The Torch, Kent Morris, describes the program as one that focuses on rehabilitation by increasing participants’ stability within community by treating them as artists rather than offenders. The program aims to decrease reincarnation by opening up new opportunities for education and employment. “The mass incarceration of First nations Australians is a national disgrace,” says Morris. “Fortunately, organisations such as The Torch, show that Indigenous led and delivered solutions to some of the ongoing issues caused by systemic over incarceration can be addressed successfully if driven by the Indigenous community.”

All works will be available for purchase, with the 100% of the sale price going to the artist.

Visit Glen Eira City Council Gallery on the corner of Glen Eira & Hawthorn Roads in Caulfield. For more information, head here.