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Singles

Hope you all had a great time at Splendour while I was busy taking care of more important matters: workshopping dozens of tweets observing how cold it is in Melbourne.

RACHEL MARIA COX : A Phone I Can’t Use

Possessing a similar candid lyrical spark present in Australia’s recent wave of (for lack of a better term) folk-punk acts, Rachel Maria Cox lays down some rolling, lush road-trip guitar licks to achieve a perfect balance of space. It’s welcoming and real. Taken from the EP I Just Have A Lot Of Feelings, launched across the country with a series of shows in the coming few weeks.

 

MAJOR LAZER FEAT. JUSTIN BIEBER & MØ : Cold Water

This does the whole acoustic-ish guitar lick modern pop thing pretty well in the verses, but that chorus is a stinker. Biebz and Diplo’s last major team-up was brilliant in its instrumental melodic hook elements, this lacks all the charm of Where Are Ü Now’s curious production. This is woozy, dumb, and deflated when it should be aiming for the stratosphere. Biebz and MØ really hit the mark vocally.

 

LOST ANIMAL : Do The Jerk

It’s been five years since the release of Jarrod Quarrell’s maiden full-length as Lost Animal. Despite the timeframe, new single Do The Jerk doesn’t stray too far in terms of sonic makeup than what was found on Ex Tropical. The struggle here is that the debut album overstayed its welcome somewhat in Lost Animal setlists, compounded by a gradually stripped back live setup. Do The Jerk does refine what was great about Ex Tropical, lyrically stronger, threaded by gnarling sax and disorientating flourish. Both the distance and proximity to Ex Tropical makes it feel less special, but still, it’s a little bit special.

 

SINGLE OF THE WEEK

KATIE DEY : Only To Trip And Fall Down Again

There’s a crisp, ornate schoolyard chant percussion that carries throughout Only To Trip And Fall Again, keeping the mood spritely as synth tones whirl with a sense of struggle. But with that struggle, there’s hope. It’s a hope that feels out of place, but I guess that’s what hope is. When I hear this, I think of Bowie’s Sense Of Doubt. Not the oppressive piano line, but the countering synth that sprouts in the darkness. There’s hope in that.