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Phill Jupitus made a triumphant Australian debut with 'Juplicity'

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Best known for his TV work (QI, Never Mind The Buzzcocks), the hilarious Phill Jupitus has made a fantastic first (in-person) impression with Australian audiences.
 
Jupitus’ style isn’t one of quick-fire gags – he’s a meandering storyteller, favouring a slow-burn approach. He plays to his strengths as a wonderfully charismatic speaker, his audience hanging off every word on the way to each potent punchline. And they aren’t called punchlines for nothing – Jupitus winds up and floors his audience with ease.
 
Notably, there’s a difference between Phill Jupitus the TV personality and Phill Jupitus the touring comedian. The man himself is sure to make the distinction between 'Telly Phill' and 'Holiday Phill' early on in the show, as if to issue a mild warning of what’s to come. But Jupitus needn’t have worried too much – certainly, the bawdy material comes as a surprise, but there’s nothing outrageously offensive here. If anything, it’s a treat to see a performer go about things entirely unshackled.
 
The first surprise of the evening arrives from the moment Jupitus takes to the stage with an acoustic guitar in hand. No spoilers, suffice to say it’s great way to kick things off and indicate that, while it might not be the Phill Jupitus you expected having watched countless panel shows, it’s still going to be a great time.
 
A key theme of the hour is Jupitus’ own sexual awakening, which lends itself to more than a few hilarious accounts of key childhood incidents and misadventures. There’s a few gross-out moments and some classic cringe comedy on offer, too, as Jupitus proves that he really is, as a confesses, a classic over-sharer. It doesn’t get old, either - the metamorphosis from mild-mannered gentleman to loud, cheeky lad can still blindside you for big laughs even as the show nears its conclusion.
 
“30 fucking years it took me to get here!” Jupitus quipped at one point during his first Australian solo show. He’ll be as pleased as his audience that it was, overall, a triumphant debut.
 
By Nick Mason